Welcome to Traditional Shitokai Karatedo Association.

This site is dedicated to enhancing the development of Shitoryu style of Karate.

Karate is a form of self defense, exercise and for personal development.

All are welcome to come train with us. See you soon!

General enquiry: [email protected]
Telephone number: +6011-5648 8240

Training and Grading Syllabus TSKA

Training and Grading Syllabus TSKA

Happy International Women’s Day

Today we celebrate women in karate in our own Honbu Dojo. Let us know Risna and Zila.

Shitoryu History

The founder (Ryuso) of karate-do Shito-ryu, Kenwa Mabuni was born on November 14, 1889 in Shuri, Okinawa. He belonged to the 17th generation from one of the bravest warriors of Ryukyu kingdom Kenio Oshiro. Kenwa Mabuni himself was a physically weak child; however, his family members often told him stories about his famous ancestors and he dreamed of becoming physically controlling. At the age of 13, Kenwa was accepted as a student at the school of the famous karate-do master Anko Itosu, who lived in Shuri. Kenwa Mabuni trained every day, even during typhoons, and within seven years he learned the art of Shuri-karate or Shuri-te.

When Kenwa was 20 years old, he began to study the art of Naha-karate or Naha-te with the Grandmaster Kanryo Higaonna. Later both of these major directions of karate-do of Okinawa formed a basis for Shito-ryu karate-do style created by Kenwa Mabuni.

The founder (Ryuso) of karate-do Shito-ryu, Kenwa Mabuni was born on November 14, 1889 in Shuri, Okinawa. He belonged to the 17th generation from one of the bravest warriors of Ryukyu kingdom Kenio Oshiro. Kenwa Mabuni himself was a physically weak child; however, his family members often told him stories about his famous ancestors and he dreamed of becoming physically controlling. At the age of 13, Kenwa was accepted as a student at the school of the famous karate-do master Anko Itosu, who lived in Shuri. Kenwa Mabuni trained every day, even during typhoons, and within seven years he learned the art of Shuri-karate or Shuri-te.

Our Senseis

Renshi George Tan (8th Dan)

Sensei Sunny Tan (4th Dan)

Sensei Wan Ozairi (6th Dan)

Our Senpais

Senpai Jack Chang (2nd Dan)

Senpai Hong (2nd Dan)

Senpai Firdaus Tajuddin (2nd Dan)

Senpai Rajeev Sharma (Shodan)

Senpai Robert Kennedy Saysoo (Shodan)

Senpai Chew Eng Chuan (Shodan)

Affiliated Dojos

Honbu Dojo

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday (8pm-9:30pm)
Sensei Sunny Tan (012-6202358)

Sunday (11am-12:30pm)
Renshi George Tan

St John's Institution, Bukit Nanas

Saturday (10am-12pm)
Sensei Wan Ozairi

Only for students of St John’s Institution

Puchong Dojo

Friday (8pm-10pm)
Saturday (10:30am-12pm)
Sunday (11am-12:30pm)
Sensei Krishnan (016-2026959)

SRJK (C) Kheng Chee, Puchong

Saturday (9am-10:30am)
Sensei Krishnan (016-2026959) / Sensei Alan Chong

SRJK (T) Casterfield, Puchong

Saturday & Sunday (4pm-6pm)
Sensei Krishnan (016-2026959)

Kajang Dojo

Saturday (4:30pm-6:30pm)
Sunday (8:30pm-10:30pm)
Sensei Ong (019-2155957)

IIUM, Gombak

Sunday (9am-11am)
Sensei Hardi (010-2310518)

Magna Ville Condo, Selayang, Batu Caves

Friday (8:30pm-10pm)
Sensei Hardi (010-2310518)

Sungai Buloh

Saturdays
Session 1: Kids / Beginners class (10:15am-11:15am)
Session 2: Adults / Advanced class (11:15am-12.15am)
Sensei Hafez (017-2027745)

Kick Start Self Defense in Cyberjaya

E2.05.02, Tamarind Square, Persiaran Multimedia, Cyberjaya
Days and hours: TBC
Sensei Firdaus (012-3038204)

TSKA is a registered body with the Commissioner of Sports in Malaysia on 13th September 2005 under the Registration No: 1585/2005

When Kenwa was 20 years old, he began to study the art of Naha-karate or Naha-te with the Grandmaster Kanryo Higaonna. Later both of these major directions of karate-do of Okinawa formed a basis for Shito-ryu karate-do style created by Kenwa Mabuni.

The founder (Ryuso) of karate-do Shito-ryu, Kenwa Mabuni was born on November 14, 1889 in Shuri, Okinawa. He belonged to the 17th generation from one of the bravest warriors of Ryukyu kingdom Kenio Oshiro. Kenwa Mabuni himself was a physically weak child; however, his family members often told him stories about his famous ancestors and he dreamed of becoming physically controlling. At the age of 13, Kenwa was accepted as a student at the school of the famous karate-do master Anko Itosu, who lived in Shuri. Kenwa Mabuni trained every day, even during typhoons, and within seven years he learned the art of Shuri-karate or Shuri-te.

When Kenwa was 20 years old, he began to study the art of Naha-karate or Naha-te with the Grandmaster Kanryo Higaonna. Later both of these major directions of karate-do of Okinawa formed a basis for Shito-ryu karate-do style created by Kenwa Mabuni.

After graduating high school and and being discharged from the army Kenwa Mabuni worked in the police for about 10 years. His job required him to visit different parts of the country and he had an opportunity to study other forms of karate-do with little-known local masters. He also studied the ancient art of Ryokan Budo.

The beginning of the 20th century has become a period of a wide spread of Karate-Do. In 1910 it was included in the school program as a separate subject, which meant the official recognition of Karate-Do. But the Karate-Do education still lacked the system. The majority of masters paid most attention to the physical training of body, wrists, elbows and fingers, using Makiwara and sandbags. There was no standard karate-do uniform, as it exists now.

In 1924 Kenwa Mabuni became the Karate-Do instructor in two schools and received the honor to demonstrate the Art for Prince Titibu.

In 1925 Kenwa Mabuni, with other masters organized “Okinawan Karate-Do Club”, which brought to life his old dream of establishing a permanent training dojo. Many famous Karate-Do leaders like Juhatsu Kyoda, Chojun Miyagi, C.Motobu, Chomo Hanashiro, Choju Oshiro, Choshin Chibana, Wu Xian Gui(Go Kenki) – the master of Chinese-ken trained in this first dojo. Kenwa Mabuni and Chojun Miyagi became the permanent instructors of the club as the youngest members.

By this time, Mabuni had become a highly respected police officer and made several trips to Japan after Funakoshi introduced karate there in 1922. Mabuni spent many of his early traveling years with Koyu Konishi, a friend and sometimes student who later founded Shindo-Jinen-ryu karate. In 1925 Mabuni and Konishi visited Japan’s Wakayama prefecture where Kanbum Uechi, the founder of Uechi-ryu, was teaching. It was after training with Uechi that Mabuni devised a kata called shinpa. But Mabuni actually spent most of his time in Osaka, where he taught at various dojo, including the Seishinkai, the school of Kosei Kokuba. Choki Motobu also taught at Kokuba’s dojo. It was Kokuba who later formed Motobu-ha (Motobu faction) Shito-ryu. In 1929, Mabuni moved permanently to Osaka. Shortly thereafter, the Japanese martial arts sanctioning body, the Butokukai, pressured all karate schools to register by style name. At first, Mabuni called his style hanko-ryu (half-hard style), but by the early 1930’s Shito-ryu was the official name. It was coined from alternative renderings of the names of Mabuni’s two foremost teachers, Itosu and Higashionna. Not everyone agreed with separating Okinawan karate into factions through the use of style names. In fact, shudokan headmaster Toyama questioned Mabuni and others about their use of what he called “funny-sounding names.” Mabuni countered that giving the style a name would not only satisfy the Butokukai, but would give people something they could identify with and feel a part of.

At this time instructors concentrated on physical training and kumite practice. When a student asked the teacher to explain something, the teacher gave him an opportunity to attack him and answered by demonstrating various defense techniques. The training was just a continuous practicing of the same techniques. All masters had varying techniques but the main teaching method was the same – practical trainings.
The year of 1927 was extremely important for Kenwa Mabuni. He met Jigoro Kano, the founder of modern Judo, who arrived Okinawa to open a new judo dojo. Chojun Miyagi and Kenwa Mabuni had an opportunity to demonstrate and to explain Jigoro Kano the techniques of Karate-Do. Jigoro Kano was inspired by Karate-Do and considered it the ideal Budo art for both defense and attack. He talked about the necessity of wide spread of Karate-Do in Japan. Being touched by these inspiration words decided to move to Osaka and to devote himself to development and popularization of karate-do Shito-ryu in Japan.

As Karate-Do was an original Okinawan Art, Kenwa Mabuni faced a wrong perception of Karate-Do when he moved in Osaka. There were no public training dojo and Kenwa tried to popularize Karate-Do in police departments and Buddhist temples. Mass audience had some difficulty accepting Karate-Do, especially Katas and frequently called it “fists dance”. Kenwa Mabuni worked days and nights, trying to invent ways of popularizing Karate-Do. He even practiced Tame shivari – the breaking of bricks and boards, showing public the force of the new martial art. Karate-Do was sometimes used during usual fights, which contradicted to its ideology and reputation. Police also tried to oppose Karate-Do since there were cases when criminals was wounded during arrest.

Despite all difficulties, Kenwa Mabuni remained on his elected way. His titanic efforts finally succeeded, and as a result the organization called Dai-Nihon Karate-Do Kai was created in 1931. Subsequently this organization was renamed into Nihon Karate-do Kai and became the predecessor of the modern Shito-kai. Many of the participating members of the Dai-Nihon Karate-Do Kai were direct students of Kenwa Mabuni. Today they form the kernel of Shito-kai in Japanese Karate-Do Federation and continue to transfer the martial art of Kenwa Mabuni to their students.
After World War II Karate-Do clubs began opening one after another in schools and universities. They organized tournaments and prepared the National championship of Japan. During difficult post-war years Mabuni helped to reconstruct Japan by devoting himself to the development and wide spread of Shito-ryu Karate-Do. Unfortunately he had no time to bring his plans to life since he died on May 23, 1952.

The Shito-ryu Karate-Do, created by Kenwa Mabuni, combined the features of Shuri karate of Master Itosu and Naha karate of Master Higaonna. The name Shito-ryu is formed from the first hieroglyphs of names of these Masters (“Ito” – old Chinese hieroglyph “Shi”, “Higa” – old Chinese hieroglyph To). While teaching his students and explaining the basic differences between schools Itosu and Higaonna, Kenwa Mabuni paid the most attention to Katas. He believed that Katas, which combine both attack and defense techniques, are the most important part of karate-Do, and that it is necessary to understand the meaning of each movement in the Kata and to perform the Kata correctly. Kenwa Mabuni was the first to introduce the concept of Bunkai kumite and Hokei Kumite, which demonstrated the purpose and showed the correct use for each Kata The final result of proper Kata and Kumite training is the ability to apply karate-do techniques in free Kumite. Practice of Kata also helps to transmit the knowledge encoded in Kata to the subsequent generation. Karate-Do Shito-ryu, unlike other karate-do styles, has much more Katas.

According to Kenwa Mabuni the student, ignoring Kata and practicing only Kumite, will never progress in Karate-Do and will never understand its meaning. The Center of Nihon Karate-do Kai was Kansai-area. Due to the efforts of Manzo Iwata (one of the best students of Kenwa Mabuni and future chairman of Japanese Shito-kai Karate-do Federation) the Eastern branch, centered in Tokyo, was organized in November 1960. In the same year the founder’s son Kenei Mabuni organized Western branch centered in Osaka. Both clubs have held independent championships until 1964, when the first joint Karate-Do Shito-Kai championship took place. In October of the same year the Japan Karate-do Federation was formed. In February 1973 the Western and Eastern branches of Nihon karate-Do merged, leading to the formation of the Japan Karate-do Federation of Shito-Kai.

Karate-Do Shito-Kai school started international activity. Karate-Do masters were sent to Asia, Latin America, U.S.A. and Europe. Official representatives from different countries gathered in Mexico City in November 1990 to discuss the development of Karate-Do in the world and the creation of International Karate-Do Shito-ryu federation. The same issue was simultaneously discussed in Havana during the first Pan-American karate-do Shito-kai championship. And finally, on March 19, 1993, the World Shito-ryu Karate-do Federation with the center in Tokyo was established, with Manzo Iwata as its president. Official representatives of 28 countries took part in the first karate-do Shito-Ryu World Championship.

Adapted from SKA website & martialsource.com

“Karate in sports is only a game of winning or losing but the true value of Karatedo is really the art of self-defense”…..George Tan

 

It was 1970 and I was 16 years old when I first started learning karate. What I really wanted to learn then was Judo. As it turned out, the Judo uniform was too expensive and that was how I ended up with karate. Sometimes life does not give you what you want as there are better things in store for you.

 

Within 4 years, with a black belt in hand, I started teaching at the Confucius School on Sunday mornings and afternoons. By 1975/76, together with Sensei Poon, we had an opportunity to start a school in St John’s Institution. Our classes were around 100 students strong and to this day, students from St John’s would still remember legacy we left behind.

 

Throughout my karate history, I have had the good fortune to not only teach but to advance my art. I have also been involved in the development of karate at the national level firstly through representing the country in sporting events, then later through chairing associations and bodies. I have served as President to Asia Pacific Shiroryu Karatedo Federation taking care of 27 member countries. I steer away from the politics that surround associations of such nature. To me money has never been my drive. I sincerely have the passion to teach all levels from the white belts to the black belts.

 

Karate has immensely shaped my life from providing me the discipline in the conduct of my life and career to a platform for me to give back to society through the transfer of knowledge to the younger generation. In 2006, I authored a book entitled Shito-Ryu Karate-Do – A traditional Art of Self Defense. It is still till today the only registered book on karate written by a Malaysian.

 

It is my hope that all karatekas will continue to train and master the art with a combination of the 3 most important aspects – SHIN-GI-TAI (Mind, Technique and Body) and allow karate be a positive in their lives as it has me.

 

 

 

Renshi George Tan teaches in Honbu Dojo every Sunday at 11 am to 1230 pm.

 

You can read more about Karate and Renshi George from his book Shito-Ryu Karate-Do – A traditional Art of Self Defense. The book can be purchased at the price of RM35 from the Honbu Dojo. An additional RM10 for postage and handling if you wish for the book to be delivered to an address in Malaysia. Please contact 018-292 6983.

Getting to know Sensei Sunny Tan

1. How old were you when you started karate?
19 years old, in 1970 June.

2. Why karate? What other options did you have?
Initially, wanted to join Judo, but found to be to costly, and friend ask me to join karate, at that time we didn’t check what styles so we just join, but no regrets.

3. What are you grateful to karate for?
Karate is not only training in dojo it also helps you in daily life. You do things more confidently, it also reduces stress especially if you focus on training.

4. What is your wish for your students and the future of the dojo?
My only wish for students and future is that what knowledge we have we impart to you and students do their best to follow and keep up the training and spread teachings of karate for everybody. As it is a lifetime art of self defence.

1. How old were you when you stated with karate?

I was 13 and karate was taught in school (St John’s Institution). Believe it or not, I was a fat boy. I chose karate as I was influenced by a video game called street fighter 2.

2. Why karate? What other options did you have?

I had a group of 10 friends who formed a karate team. We encouraged each other and that is how it all began. We also met the late Senpai Satha who inspired and motivated me. He was like a father figure to all of us, not just for karate matters. I guess in a way, karate chose me!

3. What did you wish you had done differently with regards to karate?

Nothing. The greatest teacher for me was failure as I learned from it and improved myself. I am what I am because I persevered and look at all experiences positively.

4. What was your most significant moment in karate?

One was when I beat all my St John’s seniors in kumite and kata competitions. The second was when I participated in the 4th world shitoryu tournament.

5. What legacy do you wish to leave behind?

A dojo of my own and some to take care of it with me who shares the same ideals as I do.

What motivates you to be in karate?

 

The whole thing started when I was in 16. Before that, I’ve never dream of being involve in karate. That was like an unachievable dream to me, but it changed my world after I got into it. Karate was never meant for the strong, it was for the weak, and all the teachings in it, be it mental or physical training, made me what I am today. It is an art of self-discipline and mutual respect. Karate transformed me from person with no discipline and a lack of confidence, to a person that can go through pressure and difficulties in life. It made me understand that pain is only the process of weakness going away, and I will never regret gritting through it because effort will never betray you. 

 

One of the best things I learned from karate, is that giving up will always be easier than hanging on it with self-discipline. But always remember, freedom is on the other side of self-discipline and there is nothing on the other side of giving up.

 

 

Senpai Jack is an auditor with a big accounting firm. You can often catch him on Sundays although he sometimes makes the rare appearance on a week day. 

What motivates you to continue teaching karate?

I teach to preserve the traditional style and values of karate for the future. I am still learning karate because it has many principles and ideas behind a single technique that it would likely take a lifetime to discover.

 

 

Senpai Hong teaches in the Honbu Dojo most weekdays. As his schedule is erratic, the only way to catch is to come every week day! Senpai Hong enjoys locks and throws and a whole lot of sumo stances!

I’ve started my training in 1996 in St John Institution Dojo. During my youth, I was active participating in tournaments. Now I’m taking my passion for karate to the next level, I will be starting my own martial arts academy soon in Cyberjaya. 


Sensei Firdaus can be seen in Honbu Dojos most Sundays. This may change when his center opens soon. 

Martial Arts Accomplishment:

 

2nd DAN in Taekwondo

2nd DAN in Shotokan Karate

1st DAN in Shitoryu Karate

 

2014 – 2nd Runner Up in Shukokai Karate Open Championship

2014 – 2nd Runner Up in Koshiki Karate Open Championship

2015 – Participated as Fighter in Kyukoshin Karate Bare Knuckle Championship

2019 – Represented Bukit Aman in Kejohanan Karate Piala Ketua Polis Negara (KPN).

 

Career:

Police Officer

 

Moto in life:

If you decide to quit, remember why you started.

 

 

Senpai Rajeev is almost always in the Honbu Dojo on Mondays. As he is both a karateka in the dojo and in the policeforce, his lessons are intense and gruelling. 

I started learning Shito Ryu karate do in the year 1981, when I was in Form4 as part of extra curriculum activity. St John Institution karate club was under the late Sensei Naser Anuar, Sensei Poon Boo Tek, Sensei George (Renshi), Sensei Sunny and few other great sensei. During those days, instructors from outside dojo were allowed to train at St John Institution karate club. They were dedicated and very keen to teach and share knowledge with others. Training there was always quite entertaining.

My Karate activities were pun-on hold for some time when I started work in Singapore. About 20 years back, I started training under Master Segaran at StatsChipPac Malaysia, doing mixed arts of kickboxing, Shorin Ryu karate do with a bit of Aikido.

About 10 years ago, I was quite a happy to discover Traditional Shito Kai Association (tska) Honbu Dojo at Melawati and it was being managed by Renshi George and Sensei Sunny.

I took my daughters Jennifer and Jessica along for the classes. Both of them were quite excited to attend karate classes. They enjoy training under Sensei Wan.

There are so many things to learn in karate. The history of karate is always fascinating, how the art traveled all the way from India and China to Okinawa then to Japan, how it evolves and splits into many styles.

It was fun and a challenge to learn and memorize Japanese terms that we use in karate class. Learning as well as teaching karate defense techniques and philosophical aspect of karate require patience and time.

It takes a lot of time, sweat, determination and effort to learn katas (prearranged form) and its analysis and applications. I guess, practicing karate and katas will keep me occupied mentally and physically for a quite some time to come.

Learning in karate is never ending.

 

Cheers

Mr.Kennedy

 

Senpai Kennedy can usually be found in the Honbu Dojo on erratic weekdays as he works on multiple projects out of state. 

初心。

几年前与孩子决定一起去学空手道,除了锻练精神,思维和身体,同时也可以促进亲子关系。

选上空手道,也因为穿上道服的感觉很有棒!

但是日子一久,重复的训练,一样动作,相同的基础,是相当乏味及痛苦(相信每个运动也一样)。

还要应付级配试等等…无形中確是佔领自己的生活和工作空间。

这时负面的情绪一一泛现。

有想过放弃吗?老实说,有!而且是无数次。除了工作上的琐碎的事情,压力,当然想了很多令自己舒服的藉口离场。

直到令我回想了一句话:
When you want to give up, Remember why you started.
(当你要放弃的时候,想想当初为什么开始)。

之后,我又回到了这段文章的头兩个字。

现在有人问我在学习空手道中,你得到了什么东西?我会说失去比得到的还多。

失去了高傲,偏见,愚昧,负面,迷茫等等…

至今我仍然深信,无论你学习什么事情,不妨留意失去。

失去,往往会比得到更为珍贵。

如今无论是授课,工作,或是运动,都以初心为本做基本价值。这也是给自己和对方最好的回报。

因为我选择相信这句,古派的原动力:

不忘初心,方得始终。
虽然好老土,但有效。

—–

A few years ago, in an effort to bond with my son, I signed both of us up in karate. I also thought it will be good for the mind and body. Truth be told, I have always thought that wearing the karate gi is very cool!

As the months progressed, the tedious and repetitive training was wearing me down. Then I had to deal with pain and grading stresses. Negativity began to creep in and I even thought of giving up. It was easy to give up.

Just as I was going to, a thought came to my mind – “Remember why you started”. That was enough to keep me going and here I am today. I finally got the black belt but not without the help and support of my amazing karate friends.

If someone were to ask me what I got from learning karate, I would say I lost more than I got.

I lost pride, prejudice, ignorance, negativity and confusion.

But I also gained friendship and a sense of achievement that I cannot describe.

No matter what you are doing, put all your heart into it. When you do, everything falls into place.